features
This Week in History
10 years ago: Following a rash of catamount sightings in the area, a Marlboro resident reported seeing one of the mountain lions on family property on Hamilton Road. “It was buff-colored, with roun...
Jan 11, 2018 | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Evocative mystery thriller revisits historic Tulsa event
“Dreamland Burning” by Jennifer Latham Little, Brown and Company, 2017 Rowan Chase is the 17-year-old daughter of a white Tulsa oilman and his successful black lawyer wife, a public defender. The C...
Jan 08, 2018 | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
List helps to orient the upcoming year
I am not fond of New Year’s resolutions. They have always seemed to me a self-defeating promise to myself that next year I will do a better job at whatever it was that I royally messed up this year...
Jan 04, 2018 | 0 0 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
This Week in History
25 years ago: Deerfield Valley News reporter Bonney Prince wrote about Dorr Fitch – not the road, but the person for whom the road is named. Fitch was a resident of Dover from the late 1800s to his...
Jan 01, 2018 | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Many years more tumultuous than 2017
At this time of the year, as the old year of 2017’s trials and tribulations for our country and in many family homes on a personal level come to an end, the promise of a new and better year in 2018...
Dec 28, 2017 | 0 0 comments | 37 37 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Visual imagery helps top skiers
Most expert skiers know that Olympic racers routinely use visual imagery techniques to refine their skills. In fact, Olympic champions frequently practice their turns in their “mind’s eye” before a...
Dec 25, 2017 | 0 0 comments | 46 46 recommendations | email to a friend
full story
Ideas to avoid seasonal affective disorder
by Aging in Place: Claudette My daughter, who cannot drive without talking, called this morning on her way to work to say, “I don’t want to go to work. I don’t want to do anything. It must be that blasted seasonal affective disorder kicking in.” And she was right. It runs in our family and we take the blessed Prozac year round to offset it. But with the days getting shorter, and fewer and fewer hours of daylight, we all still begin to sag. What about you? Most people (except, of course, skiers) dread the approach of winter, the cold, the dark, the ice. They moan and groan about the waning light. I wonder how many folks have the biological quirk that saddles them with seasonal affective disorder and do not even know it. When I worked I got very used to the seasonal aspect of many depressions (and there are many different types and intensity of depressions). It would start very slowly in late August, pick up speed throughout the autumn, and as the days got very short in November, the number of clients feeling miserable rose. Then in late February and March moods began to rise slightly and by April the people with more serious and severe mood disorders could begin to approach mania. I’m not sure if anyone knows exactly, besides the loss of natural daylight, what is going on. People with cycling bipolar disorder show this shift the most clearly and they tend to “go up in the spring and down in the autumn”. The sub-clinical folks who do not have such noticeable swings, but clearly feel better in summer and sluggish in the winter may just be on the low end of a spectrum or have what is called a “shadow syndrome.” Whatever the reason and the label, there are things you can do to mute winter misery.  Get exercise. That is the one sure way to fight the blahs. As much as you can stand, 20 minutes a day of raising a sweat is ideal. Aerobic exercise is the best because it raises your heart rate and pumps up your circulation and oxygen intake. I, personally, loathe exercise. I am a born slug. But even I try. I am a “dog-nut” and my pups make me take walks even when I don’t want to. They are great soothers of winter miseries in many ways. There is always the opportunity for a “three dog night” snuggle here in Vermont. Avoid excess carbohydrates if you can. Most of us sneak toward “comfort foods” in the winter but those are almost always carbs. Beef stew and lasagna and mac and cheese all look so good when the weather starts to chill and we are feeling blue. No one rushes to eat a bowl of spinach or kale to feel better. Try not to increase your alcohol intake in winter. Booze is a depressant. It makes you feel better while you are drinking but it drags your mood down as you metabolize it. Get out of the house and socialize. Doing active things with friends is good for mood. Of course, the holidays may present a big challenge if you have experienced a loss. There really is no remedy for grief except, perhaps, time. It never ceases to amaze me how in the holiday season old ghosts of past losses and sorrows somehow return to haunt us. We thought that stuff was dead and buried long ago and then – boom – it is back again. None of this should be news. We all know the recommendations for getting through the long winter. The big trick, of course, is doing them.
Dec 21, 2017 | 0 0 comments | 55 55 recommendations | email to a friend
My daughter, who cannot drive without talking, called this morning on her way to work to say, “I don’t want to go to work. I don’t want to do anything. It must be that blasted seasonal affective di...
Vermont may be tiny, but we sure are mighty
by Aging in Place: Claudette Hollenbeck
Dec 18, 2017 | 0 0 comments | 61 61 recommendations | email to a friend
I am very tickled to report that tiny, but mighty, Vermont ranks third in the nation as a place where long-term care and aging in place works well. Washington state ranks first and Minnesota second...
Stay up all night with this clever book
by One-Minute Book Reviews: Laura Stevenson
Dec 14, 2017 | 0 0 comments | 61 61 recommendations | email to a friend
“One of Us is Lying“ by Karen McManus Delacorte Press, 2017 In Bayview High, possession of a cell phone in chemistry lab is punishable by detention, so students are careful to leave their phones in...
This Week in History
Dec 11, 2017 | 0 0 comments | 74 74 recommendations | email to a friend
10 years ago: Mount Snow’s new fan guns had been covering trails for more than a week when the valley was hit by a nor’easter. The snowy December, following the “snowless winter” of 2006-2007, and ...
Tax system not serving Vermont’s rural students
by Legislative Update: Laura Sibilia
Dec 07, 2017 | 1 1 comments | 71 71 recommendations | email to a friend
It’s the winter holiday season and for many, a time of year filled with traditions among families and communities. In Vermont we also have a unique tradition that kicks off the month of December. D...
This Week in History
Dec 04, 2017 | 0 0 comments | 83 83 recommendations | email to a friend
10 years ago: Patricia Farrington’s application for an events center at Honora Winery in Halifax was “deemed approved” after the zoning board of adjustment failed to act on Farrington’s application...
  • Make a difference, one person at a time
    by Religion: Marcia Dorey
    11.22.17 - 04:20 pm
  • Reality show brain tumor
    by One-Minute Book Reviews: Laura Stevenson
    11.16.17 - 03:05 pm
  • A sweet novel about sexual fluidity
    by One-Minute Book Reviews: Laura Stevenson
    11.13.17 - 02:22 pm